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>> susie: japan in crisis. a massive earthquake rocks the asian nation. that unleashed a powerful tsunami pushing rivers of water through coastal cities and farmland. >> tom: with damages likely in the billions of dollars, we look at whether the crisis will derail japan's economic recovery and the global comeback. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everyone. a state of emergency in japan tonight. officials are still trying to assess the scope of the damage and casualties from that massive earthquake. susie, the magnitude of the quake 8.9 is the strongest on record in japan. >> susie: tom, it's still not clear what the devastating earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minut
>> susie: japan's unfolding nuclear crisis derails markets around the globe. the dow tumbled almost 300 points at the open. >> the global markets were very anxious. it was an absolute... i wouldn't call it a flight to safety; it was a flight to cash. it looked like people were desperate for liquidity. >> susie: market strategist mike holland and economist diane swonk weigh in with their analysis. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 15. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off. japan is on high alert tonight as the country responds to yet another explosion at the daichi nuclear power plant. japan's prime minister warned of substantial radiation leaks. the ongoing threat of radioactive fallout led to a global market sell-off today. we have complete coverage, beginning in tokyo with correspondent
>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
>> susie: the world watches japan as questions mount about the human tragedy and the potential damage to the global economic recovery. >> the global recovery will not be derailed by the events in japan, given everything we know today. >> susie: from the auto industry in japan to the future of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention aroun
: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from a
world news -- news. >> the morning after, japan struggles to deal with two disasters of staggering force and skate. a massive queark, -- earthquake, then a tsunami. officials confirm 200 dead but expect the numbers to rise sharmly. and there is a worry about damage around the if you can if you can power -- fukushima power plant. we take you inside zsa zsa -- war isia -- for a look at the fiercest fighting in lebia. for sheer terror and destruction, the awesome scale of what the natural world can do to us, perhaps only volcanos come close. the japan earthquake, one of the biggest the world has ever seen. it struck off the coast near the city of sendai in the late afternoon. tsunami alerts were declared in several countries. alan little reports. >> how suddenly it strikes. mortal danger descends almost in the blink of an eye and without warning. it is terrifying. in an instant, there is chaos. then from the vastness of seat there is a threat more menacing still -- a wall of water more than 20 feet high advances across the ocean at speeds of up to 500 miles an hour, the speed of a jet aircr
." >> japan appeals for international help. evacuation. some are treated for radiation exposure and the authorities ordered everyone out of the surrounding area. the grim search goes on. tens of thousands missing, and fears of another tsunami. >> everyone was just running there. trying to get as far away as possible. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- coming up, the u.n. security council discusses a no-fly zone over libya, but nothing is agreed. and conversation in bahrain. protesters set up roadblocks as 1000 at saudi troops entered the country. hello. millions in the parts of northeast japan hammered by last week's quake and tsunami have spent their fourth night without food, water, electricity, or gas. at least 500,000 people have been left homeless, but even now, much is still unknown. communications are still down in many areas. about 2000 bodies have been found washed ashore. half of them in a town that was flattened by the water. as japan struggles to deal wi
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
japan'is's eye view of damaged nuclear plant. the effort to cool it goes on. people living near this facility flee for safety. japan fears as many as 15,000 may have died. welcome to "bbc world news." forces come to's benghazi. he delivers a radio message. >> we are coming on this happy day. tomorrow, benghazi will change and there will again be a fun, dance, and cries of joy. >> has japanese nuclear engineers battle to prevent a disaster, there is no let up. half a million people made homeless by friday's earthquake and tsunami. more supplies are reaching survivors. many still lack basic necessities. dozens of the evacuation centers have been set up. thousands were forced to flee from the nuclear exclusion zone. >> they come seeking refuge. fleeing tradition of's nuclear plant -- fukushima's nuclear plant and carrying what is most precious to them. there is a chance for radiation. more than 1000 have arrived here already. there are reunions. exhaustion and relief. this family was just 5 miles from the damaged reactor. as they made it here, the fuel in their car was running out.
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
gwen: ripple effects from japan to libya and everywhere in between as the world works with the fallout from uprising and disaster. tonight on "washington week." >> ample warning was given qaddafi needed to stop his campaign of oppression or be held accountable. gwen: as muammar qaddafi closes in on rebels, the world community reacts. >> i urge you to immediately cease-fire and work with the resolution. >> the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya must be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. gwen: will can do you havey he -- will qaddafi lose his grip? are we on the brink of all-out war? while on the other side of the world, japan copes with a disaster of biblical proportions. after the quake. after the flood. now nuclear fallout. >> there's no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe radiation levels are extremely high. gwen: how japan's calamity could affect us all. covering the week, tom gjelten of npr, coral davenport of "national journal" and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning repor
>> susie: from unrest in libya to uncertainty in japan, how the unknown is coloring the outlook for oil prices. >> tom: and we get the latest from japan, one week after its deadly earthquake and tsunami. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 18. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and w
-government rally. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later, japan's nuclear safety agency raises the accident alert levels at the fukushima nuclear plant saying the situation is serious. a nation remembers. japan holds a minute of silence for those who died in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. ♪ the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity su
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey brown updates the conflict in libya, as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grade school. >>
>> hundreds are tested for radiation exposure in japan after four explosions at nuclear plant. the prime minister asks people not to panic. >> i request you act very calmly. >> amid the carnage, a survivor trapped for 96 hours, but pulled out alive. others call in vain for missing relatives. >> [unintelligible] >> powerful aftershocks are still rocking the country. one measures 6.4 and hit southwest japan on tuesday. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- tensions are running high. two protesters are killed and bahrain declares a state of emergency. and desperate to leave libya. gaddafi's forces report gains. we have reports from refugees trying to lead the conflict. -- believe that the conflict. -- leave the conflict. hello. four explosions in as many days, and radiation levels at levels authorities acknowledged to be dangerous. the struggle to stop and knelt down at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant it is ongoing. cooling water is recovering smoothly. but the plant i
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: workers at japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop g
containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
. tom, investors took a break to process all of the continuing problems in japan and the middle east. >> tom: susie, all three of the major averages ended modestly down, and trading volume was the lowest of the year. >> susie: so, what's next for the u.s. stock market? suzanne pratt got some answers. >> reporter: on wall street, they're calling it the "teflon market". throw at stocks an earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis in japan, not to mention a war in libya, yet the dow is above 12,000. nyse broker ted weisberg is surprised by the market's resiliency. but says he finds the recent volatility very troubling. >> the volatility, to me, simply says that there's no confidence. yes, the market's had a dramatic move off the lows, but for the most part, this move has not be accompanied by a lot of volume on the upside of the swing. >> reporter: still, the question is whether stocks can maintain their non-stick status? experts say that will depend on the quality of corporate profits. we'll get that news starting in about three weeks. according to thomson reuters, which tracks earnings
holes? coming up later for you -- exposed to radiation 10,000 times the normal levels, workers at japan's stricken nuclear plant on their way to hospital after yet another set -- set back. and watching the clock. how time zones around the world have turned chronology into a minefield. welcome to the program. syria has become the latest hot spot in the middle east but the ruling elite coming under its biggest challenge in three decades. thousands have demonstrated college -- thousands have demonstrated, calling for more freedom. in deraa, around 20 protesters were shot dead around the statue of the former president's was set alight. demonstrations were broken up by security forces in damascus. meanwhile, the u.n. to get beatrix secretary-general ban ki-moon has announced that syria protect their citizens fundamental rights. both pro and anti-government demonstrators held their largest rallies yet. president saleh said he would step down, but on his own terms. in libya, loud explosions near a city where rebels are fighting forces root -- loyal to colonel gaddafi. the city of misrata remai
slide. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report," new york. >> tom: in japan, the operator of a damaged nuclear power plant reports new setbacks in the effort to bring the facility under control. the plant's operator, tokyo electric power company, today reported that high levels of radiation are being found in the ocean about 100 yards offshore from the nuclear plant. and as lucy craft reports, contamination has dispersed well beyond the evacuated zone. >> reporter: for the beleaguered people of japan, there is a new menace. radiation contamination has been discovered in spinach, milk and tap water. officials say the levels don't pose a danger to human health, but they aren't taking any chances. today, the government slapped a ban on shipments of spinach from four states-- gunma, tochigi, ibaraki and fukushima, where the crippled nuclear power plant is located. milk from fukushima, the state which has borne the brunt of the radiation menace, has also been taken off the market. so far, japanese customers seem to be taking the news in stride. food sales overall are unaffected. but export
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight we take look at japan, first the scene on the ground with cnn anchor anna coren. >> it must just be so heart breaking to these people to return to their homes and see that nothing is standing. we're also hearing reports that, you know, there have been neighbors missing, so many people are unaccounted for, charlie, at the moment the death toll stands at just under 2,000, but government officials are saying that will rise well beyond 10,000. >> rose: and then the nuclear danger with david sanger of the "new york times," olli heinonen, former chief inspector for the international atomic and energy agency and nuclear physicist frank von hip. >> the good news is that the wind has been blowing offshore. but you know, the question is whether does this stand relative to chernobyl. it's way past three mile island already. >> rose: we conclude this evening by looking at the ipad 2 and the future of tablets with walt massberg of the "wall street journal" and david carr of the "new york times." >> the question is, is this going to be the ipod where
within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> a
>> welcome to our program, we begin this evening with the earthquake in japan. and an analysis by professor seth stein of northwestern university. >> this was much bigger than we expected to see on that part of the what's call the the japan trench. and one of the things we've been learning everything since 2004 was we used, before 2004 we thought we knew which piece of sub duction zones could have these really big earthquakes. the sumatra earthquake and now this one, what the earth often does, we learn to be pretty humble in the face of the complexities of the earth. the earth has the ability to surprise us. i think none of us expected that anything this big would happen there. >> rose: we continue with the president of georgia, talking about his relationship with russia and the events of 2008. >> america's main value for peoples like us, and there are many of us out there, right s that america, besides having power or economic leverage, it's also an idea t is a much bigger than than just another country. that is what makes america so strong. there is more freedomses it there i
captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> as japan continues after the earthquake strong waves are felt on the west coast. >> the elected officials find themselves bogged down. >> belva: governor brown is holding last-minute budget negotiations with republicans after missing his self imposed deadline for a special election. california's 2010 census data reveals which communities and ethnic populations are gaining ground throughout the state. and the police corruption scandal in san francisco widens with more than 50 criminal cases dropped by d.a. george gascone, coming up next. good evening. welcome to this week in northern california. joining me tonight on our news panel are, rachel gordon, city hall reporter with the "san francisco chronicle." scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio 88.5 fm. and josh richman, legal and political affairs reporter for the oakland tribune. and tom vacar, consumer editor for ktvu news. tom, you were at the uss -- >> usgs today. >> belva: what did you find out there and what is the latest they could tell you?
and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head south at a moment's notice. >> as they struggle goes on to prevent a major nuclear disaster many foreign governments are advising nationals to leave tokyo. the u.s. is not allowing any of its military within 80 kilometers of the plant. the japanese government has only told people within 20 kilometers to leave. we have obtained footage from a local tv crew wants to tell the story of those trapped. >> a japanese team makes
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and fou
representative mike pence. >> woodruff: spencer michels looks at the science behind tsunamis and whether japan's crisis is a wake-up call for the united states. >> government scientists here in seattle say their tsunami warning systems saved a lot of lives but they're not sure what would happen if the big one hits the pacific northwest. >> brown: and margaret warner updates the political chaos and escalating violence in the african nation of ivory coast. that all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more went into bringing energy to the world. >> the economy is tough right now, everywhere. >> we pumped $21 million into local economies, into small businesses, communities, equipment, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)

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